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O N LY Pf^Tkpji 6 A M E R I C A C A N ^tV E N T 

O 





Hie bonds we bought for our 
countrys defense bought and 
helped equip our farm!'' 



F CUTHEERT. GA. 



Mr. Whatley inspects a beehive 
on his 202-acre Georgia farm. 
"My wife and I wouldn't own a 
farm, clear, today," he says, "if it 
weren't for U. S. Savings Bonds. 
They're the best way to save." 



"Hie Whatfeys' story can be your sfoi^-too I 



Your dream can come true, 
Whatleys' did. Start now! It's 
take these three simple steps: 






You'll be providing security not only for 
yourself and your family, but for the free 
way of life that's so important to us alL 



1. Put saving first before you e 
your pay. 

2. Decide to save a regular amount system* 
atically. Even small sums saved this way 

a large sum amazingly soon! 



3. Start saving by signing up today ii 
Payroll Savings Plan where you work 



the 



O. S. SAVINGS BONDS 
ARE DEFENSE BONDS— 
BUY THEM REGULARLY! 



X 1. Published I 
iie offices, 2} w". 
, Single ccp,«. 1 



. 125(1 Camden f 



! isniH. $1.20. CopjTil 



NEAK ATTACK 



/^y^^y^o^^^^ /myn^r 



[ Jt was sprTm in the f£A#. mo. . -. great hope surged through the peoples or the worll 

"smI^mfn ?%™%?Z1L SW FL00DED ***" F ' ELDS - A "W*™ OF PEACE SEEMED ASSVRED 
[/*%£ rut SJ NTERE ° ™ £ NINTH "°"™ OFS *»U*S CONCILIATION AND ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORTS FOR 

PEACE THE WESTERN POWERS WERE OVERJOYED. SO POSITIVE WAS THE UNITED STATES OF RUSSIA'S SIN- 
XCtRITY, THAT A HALT HAD SEEN CALLED MONTHS AGO TO THE BUILDING OF FURTHER A-Rf>UGS sun unw 

<*«««, at > rml K£t ,m of Kg „o fouk in the,* ffacfoZfcSffkScf. °msiJ,Z S- 
\vcnro its mcssaoc of fcacc. . Nomms but feacc. on a fateful sawnoay aftefnoon mm". 




DCTROIT, THE INDUSTRIAL SIAHT, A r£* HOWS' 



N'T BOTHER " 
E NONE/ I'D RATHER 
PUT AUTOS TOGETHER 




NOTHINS SO FAR,*" 
COLONEL WINTERS/ 

SAME STORY OVER 
IDENTIFIED 

ES AT FORTY- THOUSAND 




ALL INTERCEPTORS LEFT 


THFIB |*-^*f|^^ 


FIELDS TWENTY MINUTES 1 


m ^U"*^^T^ 


COLONEL' I'M CHECKING 




THEIR PROGRESS NOW/ 




zJ&fypMWm 


If" ~~^ 




;-.=«?- 


■ jtfx\ 


■S 








^ y» 


e 




1 V • • -" BOMBARDIER TO COMRADE PILOTS *■ 

^ 014 TARGET/ GET READY/ ONE. TWO.THREE.FOUfl. 





IM THE LABYtHMTHINE CELLARS BENEATH, PANICKED 
WORKERS RUSHED TO SHUT OFF THE HUGE *ES£*- 

VOm TANKS BURIED PEEP IN THE EARTH. 






SSt.'S^K.to TX Z"«gyH 1^- fsyg-'yy^-"* ""» """" "*^SZ 



*tmy' i 




A SKELETON CML DEFENSE FORCE IN VPPE* 
MANHAT TAN RUSHED FROU ITS SHELTER TO LEW 



They emerged to find death WA irme amio rm 

FLAMES AND LETHAL 1* * ®*™*' ^ * ^Z 

WE CAME UP TOO! 




A SmOLC FLAUE SUDDENLY DFT4CHE0 ITSELF F*0* 
f FLEET AUO SfiSO OUT TO SEA . - ■ \^6^<t>J^*i. 




S3 THE LAST FICHTE* JETS L EFT THE FIELD 
WHAT'S THE MATTER 



r WE'RE DOING ALL WE CAN, 

SIR/BUT VOUR PLANE HAS A 

FUEL-LINE LEAK/ YOU 

CAN'T TAKE IT OFT 

THE GROUND" 




DON'T TELL Krtf THEY'RE «ll WPE, . 
GONNA BE STRANDED f SIR/ THERE AREN T ANY J 
HERE/ GET ME MOTHER 1 MORE PLANES , 
PLANE/ -^k AVAILABLE/ j 





After 'prolonged questioning. . . 



BUT WHY WAS THIS ^W OUR HIGH COMMAND 

ATTACK MADE AFTER F TELL US THEY CAPTURE 
YOUR COUNTRY PLEDGED / U.S. PLANS/ PLANS - 
ITSELF TO PEACE ? ^ SHOW OUR COUNTRY TO 
Be ATTACKED THIS. WEEK 
ATOM BOMB / WE MUST 
/ THAT IS 



ONCE THAT FUEL HITS V" OUT OFMT WAY/1 CANT 
tOJK HOT TAIL- PIPE . J EXPLAIN NOW/ I 
YOULL EXPLODE LIKE /\ TAKE THAT PLANE UP/ 




SUSS SCUT MS JET INTO A STRAIGHT POWER-DIVE, 
WITH tfOTORS WIDE OPEN AT SUPERSOHK -9RO0/ 

his course mt s set- -he me to intercept 

THAT BO*Bf I -rmQTY.qrvFN. THIRTY-SIX. TH1 




OfX HOUR LATER, THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED 
STATES ADDRESSED THE STRICKEN COUNTRY. 



/"i CANNOT FIND MOfCS TO EXPRESS MT INDYKG 
IgjUTTTUOE TO THE tDUNG EAGLE WHO GWE HIS 
»LFE,THATWE HERE MIGHT UVE 





"lOOKUPQV THEMMtESOFOURGIANT CITIES HUNDREDS OF YEARS IN THE 
BWLDM- SMASHED BY THE ATOM-BOMB, AND SAY: THIS SHALL NOT COME 
TO PASS} mVrETHAN EVER TODAY. ONLY A STRONG AMERICA CAN PREVENT 
THIS FROM BECOMING A REALITY/ 




LOOf /THEY'RE HITTING T IT tOUNDf UKE ^ 
WEST BERUNf OUR lOtttf ICTDMK ART tJ^ftY/ THE 
I'VE NEVER SEEK SHELlJ \ «VSSK«£5 SURE WEftft 
BURST LIKE THAT BEFORE? } BUSINESS / WE'VE SOT 
TO OCT SACK TO OUR 




Bar as met kk$b rtn touoi ntt sc-Bmes f» 
tern mem ourm f rw.i eiracwow" 

(WLUtOOUM TOUR ^1 etflSAKCl TO the q*"»l 
HGtJTBflOOK AT THAT f\ WHO KNOWS » WE COT ON 
COluM. 1 * OF RUSSIAN \ V OUTFIT LEFT ANYHOW* 




West berl 

WAS IN FL 

THE BOMBED 
our RUINS FROM 
THE PREVIOUS 
WAIT COLLAPSED 
BENEATH THE 
ATOMIC BLASTS., 




In THE STEEL AND CONCRET E SHELTER OF ALLIED 
K-ILITA*r*ACX>L>A*TE*k , \ they've CLOSES 
. WHAT ABOUT THE FIFTH) t\\. THE HIGHWAYS/TEM' 
IWNG? QAtfrYeu G£T ME J tSirtOF AIRDROME HAS 
THRQjJGM^TO THEM? S BEEN TAKEN/ALL BRIDGES 

WHAT? THE FIeIdS 1 SCROSS TWE SPREE ARE 
HAVE BEEN OVERRUN 




A.S THE COMMANDING GENERAL ENTE/KT nt 

MCN.PRE-"' 




i irfioct ttf? j* ex£i,oQae, 



'M&Nmmt.rtte tus- I 
SUNS WERE OKVJNS 
\ ruftov&i from *y ioa\ 

JEFF DECKED li) A3AN-] 
1 DON THE JEEP. 




Buvhinv ccwn *s.Lir-mri 
OARXZNEP ITRsrrt, T&ri 

pfiCto*i£A* the <cifr iyi *" 

THD SURE DID ») rfHERt OO «l 

COMPLETE JOB f «OFR0MhtRi, 




A SIGNAL UNIT/ 
THEY'RE CARRYING 
ELEPHONES/ SAY, 
THAT GIVES HE AN 
IDEA / IT'S TAKING A 
HECK OFA CHANCE, BUT 
WE HAVE NO CHOICE / 
"MERE, IVAN. LISTEN 




THERE'S * WHOLE TANK T SWING AROUND/RACE j 

COMPANY HEADED TOWARD J FOR THAT FOREST/ FULL] 

US, JEFF/ WE CANT FIGHT OUR a 

WAY OUT OF THIS/ 





T A JAM ON THAT 
BRIDGE/ rVU. TAKE AT 
LEAST AN HOUR FOR THE 
LAST UNITS TOCHOSS/ 



there's a red tankT 
column headed toward 
the bridge/ip oify're 
not stopped, we'll 
never get our guts 
across, unless' 

USE THAT 105 f 



Ttcsomo sprahs mm actio* under jot-s 

1 J GOOD ENOUGH/ IT'S POINTING)^ 






WE VE STALLED THE/ OUR LAST UNIT S 
COLUMN, BUT THESE I GOING ACROSS THE 
SHELLS ARE GETTING V RHINE NOW/A FEW 
CLOSER ALL THE Y MORE ROUNDS 
TIME/ t^^L £fJD WE'LL CESD FOR 
THE BRIDGE/ 





'AS ONLY A FEW SQUADRONS, AND THEREFORE ONLY 
I TOKEN. BUT IT WAS SOMETHING- SOMETHING TO SNOW 
THE NEDS THAT NO MATTER WHAT THE Y DID, WE'D COME 

BACK, NO MATTER WHAT THE ODDS/ f 



OPERATION HAYSTACK 



Lieutenant Edwards led his patrol down the hot, 
dusty Italian road. It would be getting dark soon, and 
they were due back at First Army Field Headquarters. 
AS fat as he was concerned, it had been an unevent- 
ful foray. Except for a skirmish with some Russian 
soldiers who had wandered on" to search for loot, 
they'd seen nothing to indicate the Russians consid- 
ered this region of strategic importance. 

There was a farmhouse up the road, and just to 
take precautions. Lieutenant Edwards ordered his men 
to scatter off the road. In a moment he realized they'd 
been lucky. Someone had come out of the farmhouse, 
and Edwards sighted him with his field glasses. Then 
a tremor of excitement ran through him as he handed 
the glasses to Sergeant Jones. Unless his eyes "were 
mistaken, he'd seen a Russian colonel come out of 
the farmhouse. 

As the sergeant confirmed his judgment, Edwards 
pondered the puzzle. What would a high-ranking offi- 
cer bf^Ljing along this supposedly unimportant road? 
Something important must be brewing. 

It didn't take long for Lieutenant Edwards to make 
up his mind. In another hour it would be dark. He 
knew he wasn't going to leave that farmhouse until 
he found out what was happening there. 

Quickly he outlined his plans to Sergeant Jones. 
"If there's really something important going on up 
there," he explained, "the place will be well de- 
fended. Twenty men would be a handful against 
what we can expert. Best thing is for me to creep up 
and reconnoiter. If I'm not back in an hour, go on to 
field headquarters and report what we've seen." 

As soon as darkness enveloped the countryside, 
Lieuteoaot Edwards took off. As he approached the 
fatmhouse, he lay flat on the ground, squirming 
ahead on his stomach, and lifting his rifle slightly ro 
keep it out of the mud. Ahead was only darkness and 
quiet It was still; there was something ominous about 
it, as if unseen eyes were watching his every move. 
He heard the whir of planes overhead. U. S recon- 
naisjnee, he knew by the sound of the engines, out to 
try tp, locate tliat munitions dump intelligence knew 
was in the area. 

"Hers was just this hill to get over, and he'd be 
approaching $ig rear of the farmhouse. It was almost 
top sirhple, Qpwn on his stomach, Edwards squirmed 
down the hjll- Still there wasn't a sound. Was it pos- 
sible trjijlt the Russians had left this side unguarded? 
There was no sound of life around the plate. He 
began to wonder i( his eyes had been playing inck.s 
on him before. 

He'd m»*ie it down the hill, and he paused for a 



moment, crouched in the shelter of the stacked hay 
near the barn. From, this vantage point he could see 
a thin sliver of light seeping out trom the shuttered 
back windows of the farmhouse. 

The point of the bayonet at his back was sharp! 
He didn't dare turn around as a guttural voice rapped 
out what was obviously a command in Russian. Then 
the guard repeated it, and there was the sound of 
running feet as someone else came up. The second 
Russian soldier fronted him, and Edwards saw the 
blue color of the private's uniform. There was a 
wicked-looking Russian snub-nosed revolver in the 
other's hand. 

For a moment Edwards wondered if they were 
going to shoot him right there. But then the soldier 
was motioning with his gun for Edwards to rise, and 
slowly he got to his feet, keeping his hands carefully 
above his head. He felt the bayonet still at his back 
as he stumbled toward the farmhouse. 

After the darkness outside, the light of the room 
hit him like a shock. But then his surprise widened 
as he saw the place had been set up as a field office! 
It was humming with activity. The colonel he'd seen 
earlier was seated behind the desk, and suddenly Ed- 
wards was convinced he'd stumbled onto the location 
of the munitions dump First Army Field Headquar- 
ters had been searching for so desperately. But, Ed- 
wards thought, there was little he could do about it 

He didn't have time to ponder it further. The 
guard who'd discovered hrm said something in Rus- 
sian, and the colonel nodded. He .eyed Edwards spec 
ulatively, and then he said in perfect English, "Sit 
down." He motioned toward the chair alongside him. 

Edwards stumbled toward the chair after a final 
thrust from his guard. He warily watched the Russian 
colonel. The guard had emptied Edwards pocket'., 
and now the colonef thumbed swiftly through thr 
assortment on his desk. There was nothing there. 

Suddenly the colonel spoke to hid). "What are you 
doing here?" he rapped. "Who sent you? How man) 
men are with you?" He fired the questions one ati^ i 
the other. 

Edwards was silent. The colonel waited, and win n 
he saw Edwards didn't intend to answer he said, 
"Bah! You intend to play the brave soldier. <>> 
Well sec how easily you'll break down!"' 

The questioning went on and on. Hour after h'xn 
the colonel hurled questions at him. The light hud 
Edwards' eyes. The colonel looked disheveled. I"« 
somehow he didn't let up for a moment. 



Edwards didn't remember when die first blow 
landed. It came suddenly from the huge, meaty Rus- 
tiin who had captured him and had stood motionless 
by his side throughout the interrogation. But now 
Edwards' head snapped bi.ck under the impact of the 
blow. He felt blood running down his split lip. He 
tried to rise, and he felt someone grip his arms from 
behind him. The blows continued, and in between 
each blow the questions were burled at him. Crazily 
be thought that even if he had wanted to say some- 
thing, the words would never come out from between 
his smashed lips. 

Then dimly he heard the colonel say, 'Take him 
iway. Let him have time to think what it will be like 
to have to return to my questioning. Bring him back 
in two hours." 

Edwards felt himself yanked to his feet. The sol- 
dier who had been smashing his mouth helped him 

Aut Slowly they stumbled through the dark around 
the farmhouse. As Edwards' eyes became accustomed 
to the gloom, he made out the haystack. He became 
aware of the activity around him. Why, he realised. 
be was standing right in the middle of the munitions 

Bump! The Russians had burrowed a huge cavern in 
the earth in back of the farmhouse. Since the top 
jhrubbery hadn't been disturbed, there would be no 
evidence of the dump from the air. No wonder recon 
hadn't been able to spot it! But now men were run- 
ning back and forth, wheeling out barrows stacked 
with rifles and cartridges. These were being loaded 
into a truck which stood camouflaged alongside the 
entrance. 

■ He felt the guard nudge him, and he trudged along 
with the man. Finally they came to what had been 

Jfcc barn. Obviously no provision had been made'for 
bolding anyone captive here. The Russian guard 
jhbved Edwards inside, and then Edwards heard the 

■oil being slid outside. 

W There was nothing in the barn that could be used 
11 a weapon, Edwards saw quickly. The place had 
been stripped bare. There wasn't even a window. 

He'd hardly finished his examination when he heard 
ibe bolt being slipped hack again. He tensed with 
■bum as the door creaked open slightly. 

It was the second soldier that had helped capture 
bim. The fellow came softly into the room. In one- 
Mad he was holding his cocked revolver, and in the 
If i . Edwards saw with amazement, that the fellow 
tallied the field glasses Edwards had dropped when 
At guard had appiehended him. The Russian soldier 
■proached him with a crafty smile. When he came 
■ j Edwards, he motioned to the field glasses, 
HVtd the gun, and said something in Russian. 

■Gtadually, Edwards came to realize what the sol 
4*f «• jnted. He'd found the glasses, and obviously 
fa believed Edwards had hidden some of his posses- 
pn before he'd been captured. The Russian soldier 



motioned to his wrist significantly. Edwards hadn't 
been wearing a wristwatch. He'd broken it and it was 
back at headquarters awaiting a replacement. The 
soldier obviously wanted to know where Edwards had 
hidden the watch. These men in the Russian Army 
were ill-equipped, and they were starved for Ameri- 
can luxuries, rhey'd do anything for i watch, Ed- 
wards realized incredulously, even endanger their 
army. 

As if to ingratiate himself, the Russian offered him 
a cigarette. Edwards took it, lit it, and purled slowly, 
stalling for rime. What should he do next, he won- 
dered. He looked longingly out the partially opened 
barn door. He'd like to run for it, he thought, but 
there was no chance of making it. His eyes lit on the 
haystack near where the Russian had found the field 
glasses. Overhead his ears picked up the delicate 
throb of U. S. recon planes approaching on their way 
back to base. 

Suddenly, as if he'd come to a decision, Edwards 
made a motion to the ground as if he'd toss down 
the cigarette. But before he ground the heel of his 
shoe over the butt, he'd quickly snapped in two the 
stiff Russian cigarette. He shoved his hands into his 
pockets, palming the burning butt, and motioned to 
the Russian with his head. 

Together they left the barn, and Edwards led the 
way back to the haystack. The sound of the approach- 
ing planes was louder now. His timing had to be 
right!" Just as the recon swarmed overhead, Edwards 
tossed the lighted butt atop the dry hay. 

The Russian uttered an oath. He came at Edwards, 
cocking his gun, and Edwards desperately plowed 
into him, deflecting his aim. He heard the crackle of 
burning hay. If only, he thought desperately, recon 
would know what it meant — if only the blaze would 
spread and outline the activity on the ground! 

As he struggled with the Russian, he heard the 
sweetest sound of his career. The slow whine of the 
dive bombers, and then the crashing thunder as the 
released bomb* hit their mark. Flaming debris fell, 
and suddenly he heard another sound — the high- 
pitched yell of Sergeant Jones. Gunfire rattled as 
Jones i ""- *•■• Marrned in. 

The Russian twisted free and tried to run. Ed- 
wards saw the gun in Jones' hand aimed, and the 
Russian toppled. Then Edwards felt Jones' pounding 
on his back. 

Later he listened to Jones apologize for going 
against orders. When Edwards hadn't returned, the 
men had itched to go trouble-shooting. "Heck, Lieu- 
tenant," Jones drawled. "We ain't one of those sissy 
record keeping patrols. The only kind of report we 
turn in is 'mission accomplished!' " 

mgao 




r THERE WILL BE NO RENDEZVOUS TOt^ROW 
ONE THIRD OF THESE PLANES WILL BE* FLAMING 
COFFINS f THE AMERICAN IDIOTS ARE SO 
CONFIDENT. . . .THEY TRUST EVERYONE/ 




As rue mcNANic checked the ejvsme . . . 





WIN CASH PRIZES! 



This magazine was meant to shock you— to woke up Americans to the 

dangers, the horror and utter futiEty of WAR/ Write us - - tell us how 

well we've succeeded, and the best letters mli wm valuable cash prizes/ 

y£\. 1.1 PRIZE $15.00 

(*$S 2nd PRIZE 5.00 

^*» y 3.J PRIZE 3.00 

4th PRIZE 2.00 

Follow these rules carefully/ Letters to be no longer ttiort 150 words, give your nome, address, 
and oge tell us what other magojmes you read regularly The judges' decision will be final. 
Suplicofe awards will be made in cose of ties. All entries must be postmarked no later than 

Ad7r«s!'cont«t Editor. JUNIOR BOOKS, INC. 23 W. 47th St.. New York 36 



Hie bonds William and I bouijnf 
•fir wr courrfnjs defense _ 
helped build a bouse for us! »a 

HOW U. 5. SAVINGS BONDS PAID OFF » 

FOR MRS. ROSE NYSSG OF BRISTOL, PA. ^k 

"There's nothing more wonderful than a house 

and garden of your own," says Mrs. Nysse, V 

"and no surer way to own one than to save for it ' 
through U. S. Savings Bonds and the 
safe, sure Payroll Savings Plan!" 






m 




"^_BJ 






made b $5,000 down 




payment on our house! " 




says Mrs. NyBse. "Al- 




together, we've saved 




S8.000 just in bonds 












keeping right on. Wheo 




wo retire, our bonds will 




















-"■"T*" 




Yw can do whrte Itysses are doing 
-•fheTimeto starris oowl 

Maybe you can't save quite as much as 
William and Rose Nysse; maybe you can 
save more. But the important thing is to 
start now! It only takes three simple steps. 
1. Mate the big decision— to put saving;?™* — 



b*:V>7, 



ir pay. 



2. Decide to save a regular amount syittem- 
atwally, week after week, or month after month. 
Even amall sums, saved on a systematic basin, 
become a large sum in an amazingly short timet 

3. Start saving by signing up today in the 
Payroll Savings Plan where you work. 
You'll be providing security not only for 
yourself and your family, but for the 
blessed free way of life that's so very im- 
portant to every American. 



FOR YOUR SECURITY, AND YOUR 
COUNTRY'S TOO, SAVE NOW- 
THROUGH REGULAR PURCHASE OF 
U. S. SAVINGS BON0S1 



;! and it* Mt^vm PmHitim af A 



An Amazing NEW HEALTH SUPPORTER BELT